Comparison of Dry Matter Partitioning of Organically and Conventionally Grown Tea for Carbon Sequestration Potential

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Premarathna, E.N.M.
dc.contributor.author Mohotti, K.M.
dc.contributor.author Gunathilaka, R.P.D.
dc.contributor.author Amarasena, D.
dc.date.accessioned 2021-02-09T07:33:52Z
dc.date.available 2021-02-09T07:33:52Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.issn 2235-9877
dc.identifier.uri http://www.erepo.lib.uwu.ac.lk/bitstream/handle/123456789/5872/253-2012-Comparison%20of%20Dry%20Matter%20Partitioning%20of%20Organically%20and%20Conventionally%20Grown%20Tea%20for%20Carbon%20Sequestration%20Potential.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y
dc.description.abstract Climate change is evident in almost all the regions in the world. In agriculture, it poses a significant impact in relation to productivity, quality and sustainability. Carbon sequestration is an adaptation strategy to climate change. Organic agriculture has a greater potential to sequester carbon in biomass and soil than most forms of conventional agriculture (Fan et al, 2005). Information on Carbon storage by tea plantations can fill the gap for comparison with native forests and changes in agricultural land use (Kamau et ed., 2008). However, the scientific validations to carbon storage in tea either in conventional and organic systems are scares. Therefore, it was identified important to generate information on dry matter partitioning of the tea bush and to compare the organic carbon content as dry matter partitioning of each part of the tea bush grown conventionally and organically to establish carbon sequestration potentials of organically grown tea as compared to conventionally grown tea en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Uva Wellassa University of Sri Lanka en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries ;Research Symposium
dc.subject Tea Technology and value Addition en_US
dc.subject Tea Technology en_US
dc.subject Geography en_US
dc.title Comparison of Dry Matter Partitioning of Organically and Conventionally Grown Tea for Carbon Sequestration Potential en_US
dc.title.alternative Research Symposium 2012 en_US
dc.type Other en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search UWU eRepository


Browse

My Account